arib: (TARDIS)
Aliza (after a pre-bedtime nurse and bedtime story): RAB, it's time to brush your teeth.
RAB (recent convert to the Church of Won't Brush Teeth): *shakes head* Ima, ruboobak!
Aliza: What?
RAB: Ima! Ruboobak!
RAB (proceeds to crawl over Aliza, and begin rubbing her back): Ruboobak!
Aliza: (after she and I crack up) You still need to brush your teeth.
arib: (Banana)
When I've gotten home from work, I've been greeted at the door by a running round-the-leg hug.

It's really nice.

Holy $#!^

May. 19th, 2011 07:07 pm
arib: (silly)
A certain young lady went three days without a number two. Her streak* ended today during daycare. Looking at the bag of dirty clothing that got sent home with her, I'm not sure whether to call a dry cleaner or an exorcist. Maybe I should just get a flamethrower...


*pun slightly intentional.
arib: (silly)
RAB has figured how to reliably roll over from her back to her front. Each time she does so, the timeline runs something like this:

-For the first twenty to thirty seconds, she seems very proud of herself, and smiles at everyone in the room.

-Immediately after this, she remembers just how much she hates being on her stomach, and gets frustrated and upset until someone rolls her back over. Thus far, she's only been able to roll herself from front to back once.

-About twenty minutes ago, I peeked in on RAB as she slept. She had managed to roll herself over, and seemed uncomfortable. I rolled her back and she settled down, all without waking up.
arib: (Default)
A question I get very often, both from random strangers and my own grandmother tends to run along the lines of, "is your daughter a good baby or a bad baby?"

I'm never quite sure how to answer this one. It's not like she robs banks or abuses animals or anything. I know that they really want to know whether or not she cries a lot, but it always comes across like they're imposing some moral or value judgement. :-)

Another fun thing was when a friend of Aliza's grandmother, who definitely was trying to compliment RAB came out with the following:

"Kinnahora,* your child is too beautiful. A bird should crap on her head!"

I was able to stammer out some sort of a thank you. I would have gotten upset, but she seemed so genuine and complimentary about it that I let it slide.


*A contraction of the Yiddish "k'neyna hora," which more or less translates as "without giving you an evil eye." Hearing it pronounced Kinnahora makes me want to open a kosher Irish bar called Ken O'Hara's.
arib: (Default)
A question I get very often, both from random strangers and my own grandmother tends to run along the lines of, "is your daughter a good baby or a bad baby?"

I'm never quite sure how to answer this one. It's not like she robs banks or abuses animals or anything. I know that they really want to know whether or not she cries a lot, but it always comes across like they're imposing some moral or value judgement. :-)

Another fun thing was when a friend of Aliza's grandmother, who definitely was trying to compliment RAB came out with the following:

"Kinnahora,* your child is too beautiful. A bird should crap on her head!"

I was able to stammer out some sort of a thank you. I would have gotten upset, but she seemed so genuine and complimentary about it that I let it slide.


*A contraction of the Yiddish "k'neyna hora," which more or less translates as "without giving you an evil eye." Hearing it pronounced Kinnahora makes me want to open a kosher Irish bar called Ken O'Hara's.
arib: (Default)
RAB is starting to notice that there are people in the mirror. This started last week at my grandmother's house, when I noticed that she was making eye contact with my reflection, and seems to have carried over until today*.

She seems much more comfortable with Abba-in-the-mirror than with baby-in-the-mirror, but started smiling at her reflection a little bit, after some encouraging.

It was lots of fun, and made up for my feeling like I was neglecting her by leaving her in daycare all day.



*Given that we spent the rest of last week in a shiva house, where the mirrors are traditionally covered over, we couldn't really play with it much when we were in Toronto.
arib: (Default)
RAB is starting to notice that there are people in the mirror. This started last week at my grandmother's house, when I noticed that she was making eye contact with my reflection, and seems to have carried over until today*.

She seems much more comfortable with Abba-in-the-mirror than with baby-in-the-mirror, but started smiling at her reflection a little bit, after some encouraging.

It was lots of fun, and made up for my feeling like I was neglecting her by leaving her in daycare all day.



*Given that we spent the rest of last week in a shiva house, where the mirrors are traditionally covered over, we couldn't really play with it much when we were in Toronto.
arib: (Default)
Hi, everyone.

The past few weeks have been full of extreme highs and lows.

On the good side of things, my sister Shifra got engaged last week to her boyfriend of (I think) three years. They're planning on a late summer wedding, and I'm really looking forward to it. Oddly, while becoming a parent didn't make me feel old, my little sister's engagement did. :-)

On a sadder note, Aliza's paternal grandfather entered hospice a few days ago. He's been battling mesthelioma pretty much since Aliza and I started dating, and things seem to have reached the final stages. Right now he's resting comfortably, and his immediate family is nearby. Aliza and I are both incredibly grateful that he was able to travel down to Boston from Toronto back in December to meet Rena.

Through everything, Rena, like her name, has been an absolute joy. It's been amazing watching her grow and develop. She's much more aware of herself, and the world around her. She's much more aware of her hands, and was very pleased with herself when she learned that they could be put in her mouth. (Freud would have a field day with that. Freud's got issues.) She's also started to notice her feet, which she'll stomp when the mood takes her. She's also smiling more, which is fun, too.

That's all for now, more as things develop.
arib: (Default)
Hi, everyone.

The past few weeks have been full of extreme highs and lows.

On the good side of things, my sister Shifra got engaged last week to her boyfriend of (I think) three years. They're planning on a late summer wedding, and I'm really looking forward to it. Oddly, while becoming a parent didn't make me feel old, my little sister's engagement did. :-)

On a sadder note, Aliza's paternal grandfather entered hospice a few days ago. He's been battling mesthelioma pretty much since Aliza and I started dating, and things seem to have reached the final stages. Right now he's resting comfortably, and his immediate family is nearby. Aliza and I are both incredibly grateful that he was able to travel down to Boston from Toronto back in December to meet Rena.

Through everything, Rena, like her name, has been an absolute joy. It's been amazing watching her grow and develop. She's much more aware of herself, and the world around her. She's much more aware of her hands, and was very pleased with herself when she learned that they could be put in her mouth. (Freud would have a field day with that. Freud's got issues.) She's also started to notice her feet, which she'll stomp when the mood takes her. She's also smiling more, which is fun, too.

That's all for now, more as things develop.
arib: (Angry)
This morning, I went to the Tip O'Neill Federal Building so I could get a duplicate Social Security card. (My original card was in a wallet that was stolen when I lived in Israel back in 1998. Stupid of me, I know...)

Since it was a government building there was the standard metal detector and bag scanning device. As usual, I resigned myself to the extra hassle of standing on line, emptying my pockets, and getting ready to walk through the arch.

Unlike previous trips, I had my daughter with me.

To wit, I have the following observations to make:

1. When you tell me "leave the stroller with your child in it, walk through the metal detector, then come back and get the stroller when we've cleared you," you can bet your sweet ass that I'm going to walk through that arch backwards, never taking my eyes off of my child.*

2. After getting cleared, I walked back through the arch, retrieved RAB, wheeled her through the arch in her stroller, and went about my business. The stroller made the arch beep, given that it's primarily made of metal. Nobody bothered to stop me or check the stroller or my daughter in any appreciable way.

3. The metal parts of the stroller are hollow. Anybody who's desperate and stupid enough could get a stroller, pack the hollow bits full of whatever contraband you want (C4 and a detonator, gun parts, flash drives containing videos of Glenn Beck, whatever), and wheel it right in.

4. The combination of points 2 and 3 make the whole "empty your pockets, place all bags on the belt, and walk through this dingus" thing absolutely pointless.


I just can't wait until we fly or travel internationally with my kid in tow, I'm sure it'll be just as educational.


*To the guard's credit, he stood right next to the stroller, didn't let anyone else come near it, and actually made smiley faces at my kid. I suspect he realizes how incredibly uncomfortable that request must make people feel.
arib: (Angry)
This morning, I went to the Tip O'Neill Federal Building so I could get a duplicate Social Security card. (My original card was in a wallet that was stolen when I lived in Israel back in 1998. Stupid of me, I know...)

Since it was a government building there was the standard metal detector and bag scanning device. As usual, I resigned myself to the extra hassle of standing on line, emptying my pockets, and getting ready to walk through the arch.

Unlike previous trips, I had my daughter with me.

To wit, I have the following observations to make:

1. When you tell me "leave the stroller with your child in it, walk through the metal detector, then come back and get the stroller when we've cleared you," you can bet your sweet ass that I'm going to walk through that arch backwards, never taking my eyes off of my child.*

2. After getting cleared, I walked back through the arch, retrieved RAB, wheeled her through the arch in her stroller, and went about my business. The stroller made the arch beep, given that it's primarily made of metal. Nobody bothered to stop me or check the stroller or my daughter in any appreciable way.

3. The metal parts of the stroller are hollow. Anybody who's desperate and stupid enough could get a stroller, pack the hollow bits full of whatever contraband you want (C4 and a detonator, gun parts, flash drives containing videos of Glenn Beck, whatever), and wheel it right in.

4. The combination of points 2 and 3 make the whole "empty your pockets, place all bags on the belt, and walk through this dingus" thing absolutely pointless.


I just can't wait until we fly or travel internationally with my kid in tow, I'm sure it'll be just as educational.


*To the guard's credit, he stood right next to the stroller, didn't let anyone else come near it, and actually made smiley faces at my kid. I suspect he realizes how incredibly uncomfortable that request must make people feel.
arib: (Default)
I'm in the middle of my second week of paternity leave. I thought I'd record a few of my thoughts while I have a free moment. So, in random order:


-On some small level, it still doesn't feel "real." Part of me is still surprised that there's this new little person in my life, and is waiting for the other shoe to drop. The rest of me knows. :-)

- I'm impressed with how helpful people are when I'm out with the baby. Lots of folks do things like hold doors for me when I'm pushing the stroller. With the weather we've had lately, the sidewalks are narrower due to piled snow. People walking towards me tend to step aside and let me wheel by before I have the chance to pull over for them. I'm happy to note that this tends to come from all sorts of people, and there isn't some sort of age/gender/ethnicity bias, as far as I can tell.

-I get lots of compliments about my daughter. For some reason, this makes me feel a little weird. I mean, I think she's the most beautiful baby in the world, but I'm partial. I always try to be gracious about it and say thank-you, but it's still a bit weird for me.

-Weirdly, I seem to get a lot of attention from women of the "young and single" variety. It's nice and all, but curious.

-Rena is really blossoming. She's become more aware of her hands. While she's not at the point of reaching for things that she sees, she's taken to grasping my shirt/sleeve when Aliza or I hold her. If I'm wearing a short-sleeved shirt, she sort of plays with the hair on my arm.

-She's also making eye contact very reliably, and will try to catch your eye, or move into a position where she can see your face.

-She's starting to smile socially. At this point, you really need to smile at her and prompt her a lot to get a smile in response. Thus far, I've only ever seen her spontaneously smile socially at Aliza.

-As much as I enjoy taking Rena to Aliza's workplace so they can have a middle of the day feeding, I'm pretty sure that Rena has no idea that we're doing anything out of the ordinary. She really likes the stroller, though, and will fall asleep after being walked around for a few minutes.

-Fortunately, she's taken to having expressed milk from a bottle really well, and we haven't had to deal with nipple confusion or anything like that. The first time I fed her a bottle, she seemed a little confused, but took the bottle. The dialogue on her face pretty clearly said, "I'm not sure how you're pulling this off. You're not the person who usually does this. I'm confused, but I like the outcome, so I'll play along."

-When my brother Dani fed her a few days later, the dialogue on her face said, "who the hell are you? Are they letting just anyone in on this... omnomnomnom"

-Dani then proceeded to burp her, which she did. She then started making another noise. Dani let me know that she had the hiccups.

-I only had enough time to say "her hiccups don't sound like..." before she spit up on him in epic fashion. Epic. Fashion. Clothes needed to be changed, an unscheduled baby-bath happened, we counted our lucky stars that she didn't hit the couch. Epic.

-To his credit, Dani took it well. I'm sure I'll get that loaner t-shirt back eventually.

More as it comes to me...
arib: (Default)
I'm in the middle of my second week of paternity leave. I thought I'd record a few of my thoughts while I have a free moment. So, in random order:


-On some small level, it still doesn't feel "real." Part of me is still surprised that there's this new little person in my life, and is waiting for the other shoe to drop. The rest of me knows. :-)

- I'm impressed with how helpful people are when I'm out with the baby. Lots of folks do things like hold doors for me when I'm pushing the stroller. With the weather we've had lately, the sidewalks are narrower due to piled snow. People walking towards me tend to step aside and let me wheel by before I have the chance to pull over for them. I'm happy to note that this tends to come from all sorts of people, and there isn't some sort of age/gender/ethnicity bias, as far as I can tell.

-I get lots of compliments about my daughter. For some reason, this makes me feel a little weird. I mean, I think she's the most beautiful baby in the world, but I'm partial. I always try to be gracious about it and say thank-you, but it's still a bit weird for me.

-Weirdly, I seem to get a lot of attention from women of the "young and single" variety. It's nice and all, but curious.

-Rena is really blossoming. She's become more aware of her hands. While she's not at the point of reaching for things that she sees, she's taken to grasping my shirt/sleeve when Aliza or I hold her. If I'm wearing a short-sleeved shirt, she sort of plays with the hair on my arm.

-She's also making eye contact very reliably, and will try to catch your eye, or move into a position where she can see your face.

-She's starting to smile socially. At this point, you really need to smile at her and prompt her a lot to get a smile in response. Thus far, I've only ever seen her spontaneously smile socially at Aliza.

-As much as I enjoy taking Rena to Aliza's workplace so they can have a middle of the day feeding, I'm pretty sure that Rena has no idea that we're doing anything out of the ordinary. She really likes the stroller, though, and will fall asleep after being walked around for a few minutes.

-Fortunately, she's taken to having expressed milk from a bottle really well, and we haven't had to deal with nipple confusion or anything like that. The first time I fed her a bottle, she seemed a little confused, but took the bottle. The dialogue on her face pretty clearly said, "I'm not sure how you're pulling this off. You're not the person who usually does this. I'm confused, but I like the outcome, so I'll play along."

-When my brother Dani fed her a few days later, the dialogue on her face said, "who the hell are you? Are they letting just anyone in on this... omnomnomnom"

-Dani then proceeded to burp her, which she did. She then started making another noise. Dani let me know that she had the hiccups.

-I only had enough time to say "her hiccups don't sound like..." before she spit up on him in epic fashion. Epic. Fashion. Clothes needed to be changed, an unscheduled baby-bath happened, we counted our lucky stars that she didn't hit the couch. Epic.

-To his credit, Dani took it well. I'm sure I'll get that loaner t-shirt back eventually.

More as it comes to me...
arib: (Default)
Aliza and I will often sing to Rena when she's crying. Sometimes it helps her calm down, sometimes it keeps us sane. Sometimes things like this happen:


The scene- A changing table
The time- diaper changing
The mood- cranky
The tune- that song from summer camp and elementary school

A&A- "We love you Rena, oh yes we do"
Ari unsnaps a onesie, Aliza prepares a fresh diaper, Rena squalls a little.

A&A- "We don't love anyone as much as you"
Ari opens diaper, and begins wiping. Rena cries

A&A- "When you're not with us, we're blue"
Aliza prepares to swap the old diaper for the new one, when Rena sticks her foot into the old diaper

A&A (not missing a beat) "You stuck your foot in poo!"
arib: (Default)
Aliza and I will often sing to Rena when she's crying. Sometimes it helps her calm down, sometimes it keeps us sane. Sometimes things like this happen:


The scene- A changing table
The time- diaper changing
The mood- cranky
The tune- that song from summer camp and elementary school

A&A- "We love you Rena, oh yes we do"
Ari unsnaps a onesie, Aliza prepares a fresh diaper, Rena squalls a little.

A&A- "We don't love anyone as much as you"
Ari opens diaper, and begins wiping. Rena cries

A&A- "When you're not with us, we're blue"
Aliza prepares to swap the old diaper for the new one, when Rena sticks her foot into the old diaper

A&A (not missing a beat) "You stuck your foot in poo!"
arib: (Default)
But I suspect we're having our own little Wikileaks controversy here at home...
arib: (Default)
But I suspect we're having our own little Wikileaks controversy here at home...
arib: (Default)
To follow up on my brief phone post, here's a slightly longer version of events.

birth stuff )

tl:dr version: 27.5 hours of labor, followed by a c-section, and a little blue baby who took a little bit to get going.

she's out! )
arib: (Default)
To follow up on my brief phone post, here's a slightly longer version of events.

birth stuff )

tl:dr version: 27.5 hours of labor, followed by a c-section, and a little blue baby who took a little bit to get going.

she's out! )